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20130115
20130123
Search Results 0 to 12 of about 13 (some duplicates have been removed)
an inauguration gift for president obama. they're offering up a compromise on the debt ceiling: a three month increase in the federal borrowing limit. it's expected to come to the house floor next week, but it comes with strings attached. the proposal includes a condition that house and senate lawmakers pass a budget blueprint for the coming year or go without pay. house majority leader eric cantor said it's simple. congress shouldn't be paid for failing to do its job. >> tom: next week 80 companies are scheduled to turn in their latest quarterly financial report cards. but rather than the short-term focus on the bottom line, our next guest thinks businesses need to consider all stakeholders, not just shareholders. john mackey is the co-founder and co-c.e.o. of whole foods market. he's author of "conscious capitalism: liberating the heroic spirit of business". john, why is concentrating on shareholders a myth as you call it? >> i don't know if concentrating on shareholders is a myth. i mean, most companies do concentrate on their shareholders. it's just not the best business strategy. because
evening everyone. i'm susie gharib. president obama tells congress we're not a deadbeat nation, and they need to raise the debt ceiling now, so we can pay our bills on time. >> tom: i'm tom hudson. a sour day for apple investors. the stock tumbles to 11 month lows on new worries about waning demand for the iphone 5. >> susie: but a banner day for g.m., the cadillac ats takes car of the year at the big auto show in detroit, and its new corvette stingray wows gear heads around the globe. >> tom: that and more tonight on "n.b.r."! >> susie: the next big fight in washington has begun. president obama today called on republican lawmakers to authorize an increase in the nations debt limit, saying that messing with it could potentially have catastrophic results for many americans and the overall economy. he warned markets would go haywire if congress does not act, interest rates would rise, and checks to social security beneficiaries would stop. and he said even thinking about the u.s. not paying its bills is irresponsible and, "absurd". darren gersh reports. >> reporter: in his first
unless president obama and the democrats want us to. it's just a scare tactic to continue the spending that they don't want to address. that's why they keep saying, "oh, we're going to default. we're going to default. we're going to default." it's just not true. >> reporter: but talk like that scares many budget analysts in washington. they argue markets will see a failure by the unit ed states to pay any of its bills as a threat it could one day stop paying some or all of its bills, including terest on its debt. if we pay the chinese the interest we owe them on their sovereign debt holdings, on time and in full, but we don't pay social security recipients or armed services personnel their salaries, is that a default? well, of course it is. >> reporter: a recent inspector general's report found the treasury doesn't have the computer systems in prioritize some payments over others. so if the treasury runs short of cash, it would most likely delay writing checks until it collects enough in tax revenues to avoid going into the red. but that means unpaid bills would pile up and take longer
? economist julia coronado joins us. wall street kicked off the first trading day of president obama's second term with solid gains. helping push the blueererben ttd high were better than expected results from a cautious but hopeful dupt.hi the dow rose 62 points, the nasdaq added eight, and the s&p up 6.5 points. >> susie: today's gains extend a strong stretch of stock buying, one that began before the new year. despite concerns about corporate profits and debt negotiations in washington, investors are finally embracing equities again. suzanne pratt reports. >> reporter: perhaps it's optimism about a fresh start in washington, or maybe it's that the economy is finally building a stronger foundation. whatever the cause, the effect is that the dow, s&p 500 and nasdaq are all are up more than 4% in the first three weeks of this year. wall street veteran art cashin says with interest rates still so low, investors have a new taste for equities, particularly pension funds. >> they've got to up their risk profile, and therefore they're going to buy stocks. and some of that money is coming in not wi
Search Results 0 to 12 of about 13 (some duplicates have been removed)